smoking acupuncture

Escaping Smoking With Acupuncture

Quitting is your best decision ever!

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Introduction to Smoking Acupuncture Net

| Introduction | By: admin

In recent years, acupuncture has had both media coverage and some scientific interest for its effects for those trying to quite the evil weed – smoking cessation to end cigarette smoking, rolling tobacco smoking and tobacco  pipe smoking. Ear acupuncture can be performed by practitioners trained specifically to use it as an adjunctive therapy for people trying to stop smoking. Another method is Traditional Chinese Medicine, where smokers are also encouraged to try ear acupuncture to help quitting tobacco, but may also be given some body acupuncture points to try assist their detoxification and recovery of better health.

A mound of cigarette butts

A mound of cigarette butts

History and studies
A great deal of evidence exists to suggest that acupuncture may be used to successfully treat a variety of addictions. It was first reported in the 1970s by Dr H.L. Wen, a physician in Hong Kong, who studied patients with active opium addictions (1). The patients were receiving electro acupuncture for post surgical pain relief but also had unexpected relief from withdrawal symptoms. Dr Wen further studied acupuncture and naloxone (used to treat opiate addiction) an found 51% of patients drug free a year later (1). The studies were repeated elsewhere and from this early work, Dr Mike Smith and clinical team at the Lincoln Hospital, New York began developing ear acupuncture protocols for treating single and multiple drug addiction (2). In 1985, this work was expanded with the formation of the National Association for Detoxification (NADA) to promote the protocols with professionals coming into working contact with drug addicted clients. Studies indicated acupuncture was effective (3), and interestingly, did not appear to be specific to opiate drug detoxification. This lead to its use with a wide variety of addictive substances, including tobacco addiction.

Click on the Categories on the right to find out more about Ear Acupuncture, Traditional Chinese Medicine body acupuncture, studies and quitting smoking.

Acupuncture model

Acupuncture model

References

1. Wen, H.L. 1975. Role of acupuncture in narcotic withdrawal. Medical Progress. 2, pp15-16.

2 Smith, M.O. 1988. An acupucnture programme for the treatment of drug addicted persons. Bulletin on Narcotics. XL (1), pp.35-41.

3 The British Acupuncture Council. 2000. Substance abuse & acupuncture: the evidence for effectiveness. London: Acupuncture Research & resource Centre. Available at:
http://www.acupuncture.org.uk/content/Library/doc/addiction_bp7.pdf

DISCLAIMER: NO information here is intended to be taken as medical advice – or used as a substitute for professional medical advice. Any person with any health concerns is advised instead to consult their doctor. In the case of persons seeking therapy using Traditional Chinese Medicine, this information cannot be taken as medical advice and persons are advised instead to consult a suitably qualified professional practitioner.

Posted by: Daniel Clarke

Photo Credits:

A mound of cigarette butts – ‘The World of Cigarrettes’ by http://www.sxc.hu/profile/giacom ‘Acupuncture Head’ by  http://www.sxc.hu/profile/beer

TCM Acupuncture In Smoking Cessation

| TCM Body Acupuncture | By: admin

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) maintains that the body’s Qi (vital energy) flows around the body through 12 regular channels, which link the different organs, and each other. The channels form a network, or matrix of channels all over the body. There are also eight extraordinary meridians, which interconnect and again connect back to the twelve regular channels. They can be seen as a reservoir for energy from the twelve regular channels.

Acupuncture treatment

Acupuncture treatment

In ill health, including addictions, the body’s Qi is unbalanced, the flow may be ‘irregular’, ‘unsmooth’  and therefore the person experiences various symptoms of body and/or mind.

A very simple description of acupuncture points can be seen as places where the Qi can be influenced; therefore this is why they are needled. The needling helps to influence and correct the disordered Qi along the channel, and regulate the disordered Qi of the organs.

In any long term addiction, the body’s Qi is said to be profoundly  affected. Since TCM understands that imbalance in one channel or organs will over time have an effect on other organs and channels, points on other channels are usually also chosen to reflect the patient’s symptoms and general emotional patterns.

TCM acupuncture clinic sessions may involve body and ear acupuncture needling simultaneously, as neither is contraindicated. Within TCM, the ear would be as theoretically valid as only other place to needle, although it has to be said that lower legs and arms and the back are perhaps most commonly used along with points at or near the affected body part. Interestingly, in modern times, many ear acupuncturist colleagues specialize only in working on the ear, feeling its effects are adequately powerful for their purposes.

Acupuncture generally  involves a health consultation before points are chosen according to the TCM diagnosis. The acupuncturist leaves the room to allow the patient to roll up trouser legs or remove a shirt. Towels are usually left on the couch to avoid them feeling cold or embarrassed by feeling ‘over-exposed’. The practitioner then makes sure the patient is comfortable and inserts the needles. In the West, generally speaking practitioners use sterile disposable fine needles, manufactured specifically for acupuncture. (In Europe these must carry a CE mark on the packaging to show quality control.) The needles are inserted carefully, and then they stay in place for usually around 20 to 30 minutes. Most practitioners leave the patient to relax alone, checking on them periodically. At the end of the treatment, the practitioner removes the needles for disposal into a sharps bin.

A usual course of acupuncture is 6 to 10 sessions, although this will vary from patient to patient and practitioner to practitioner.

DISCLAIMER: NO information here is intended to be taken as medical advice – or used as a substitute for professional medical advice. Any person with any health concerns is advised instead to consult their doctor. In the case of persons seeking therapy using Traditional Chinese Medicine, this information cannot be taken as medical advice and persons are advised instead to consult a suitably qualified professional practitioner. Also please note acupuncturists’ working styles do vary between practitioners, so this general overview can’t be used any kind of ‘benchmark’ for judging their standards! Many thanks for your understanding.

Posted by: Daniel Clarke & CK Rivera

Incorporating Acupuncture Into A Smoking Cessation Programme

| How Acupuncture Can Fit In | By: admin

You can succeed - quit smoking

You can succeed - quit smoking

Incorporating Acupuncture Into A Smoking Cessation Programme

Whilst acupuncture and ear acupuncture may help smokers stop, the general consensus seems to be that it’s good to include it as part of a stop smoking programme, not rely on it alone to magically make you stop!

The links at the bottom give some resources for organisations that help smokers find help to quit. In the meantime, here are some tips that people have used:

  • Joining a quitters programme – there are many programmes specialising in stopping smoking, using varying methodologies but you may find it easier to do it if you have encouragement from a coach, mentor, and/or stop smoking group. There are online groups too; however this may mean you don’t get the benefit of face to face interaction with a trained mentor or coach.
  • Encourage those around you to be supportive of your quitting time
  • Speak to your primary healthcare physician – you may be able to get free help, depending on which schemes are available where you live
  • Eat a healthy diet. AS diet consisting of high sugar, high fat junk food is going to make you feel lousy in any case and it’s not a great idea while your body is trying to detoxify itself. Try instead to eat a balanced diet including fruit, vegetables, and drink water and herbal teas to help you as you detoxify.
  • Beware of expensive, so-called ‘miracle products’ – laws on over-the-counter products vary by countries and states, but a little bit like diet miracle pills, if there was a product that did all the work for you, wouldn’t everyone be using it? The question of what is in the product and is it safe is also an alarming factor to consider.
  • There are of course, nicotine replacement therapy (the ones that contain nicotine) products available over the counter in many countries – although some programmes don’t advocate their use, claiming they switch the dependency to another addiction to an unnecessary product.
  • Hypnotherapy, when practiced ONLY by a qualified, ethical practitioner is one popular way to go. The key to it is the above statement – qualified and ethical practitioner. Good hypnotherapists point out the ‘therapist’ ion their titles – it requires proper training to be both safe and effective. There are some products on the market which are for home use, again, at the very least, check the credentials of the hypnotherapist involved carefully.
  • Exercise is great for helping you feel better, even simple inexpensive things like dancing to your favourite songs at home. One often repeated piece of advice is to always check with your physician before embarking on an exercise regime.

Posted by: Kaz Strom

Photo Credits

Jumping girl http://www.sxc.hu/profile/Mattox

Here’s a few links to FREE resources for USA, Canada, UK, Australia, New Zealand and online free websites you can join.

UK

The NHS’s smoking cessation online presence:

http://smokefree.nhs.uk/

QUIT, a charity devoted to people escaping smoking:

http://www.quit.org.uk/

ASH (Action On Smoking And Health), another charity, with a whole page of help lines:

http://www.ash.org.uk/ash_210bby6l.htm

ASH’s Essential Information page:

http://www.ash.org.uk/ash_xwu8d7wa.htm

USA

The CDC has a number you can call to get free help )perhaps even free coaching):

http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/quit_smoking/

Canada

Free resources including phone line from Health Canada:

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hc-ps/tobac-tabac/quit-cesser/now-maintenant/index-eng.php

Australia

ASH (Action on Smoking And Health) – may be able to pinpoint resources in your area

http://www.ashaust.org.au/default.htm

For moms to be and new parents

http://www.smokefreebaby.org.au/quitting_during_pregnancy.php

New Zealand:

ASH (Action on Smoking And Health) – may be able to pinpoint resources in your area

http://www.ash.org.nz/index.php?pa_id=117

Free To Join Online Quit Smoking Websites

http://www.quit4good.com/

http://www.neversmokeagain.com/

www.quitnet.com (although there is also a level of membership you are required to pay for, there is a free level too)

DISCLAIMER: Please only consult you primary healthcare physician for medical advice, the information here is not medical advice. Also please be aware www.acupunctureandsmokingguide.com cannot be responsible for the content of external links, nor do we automatically endorse and we don’t receive any sponsorship from them! Every quitter is different, and these links are posted here in good faith. Many thanks.